Volunteers & Recruits

Ilkley Gazette – April 21st 1916.
Addingham Volunteers Presentations.
Mr. G. Douglas of Farfield Hall has presented 50 uniforms to the Addingham company of 20th West Riding Volunteers, and last week a gathering was held in the c1ubroom of the Crown Hotel to present Mr. Douglas with a framed enlarged photograph of the members of the company, in recognition and appreciation of his kindness. Unfortunately Mr. Douglas was unable to attend, and Mr. W. Dunlop the Commandant of the company was deputed to hand over the photograph to Mr. Douglas. In replying on behalf of Mr. Douglas, Commander Dunlop thanked the company. Mr. Douglas although he could not often be with them, took a keen interest in the welfare of the company. Adjutant Voight called upon Quartermaster Sergeant Nuttall to make a presentation of a similar framed photograph to Mr. Dunlop. In doing so Sergeant Nuttall said “The Addingham company had got the best officer in the Wharfedale battalion, they were proud to obey his orders, they held him in such respect that it was a pleasure as well as a duty to serve under him”. Commander Dunlop in acknowledging the gift said “Never in all of his life had he received any present which gave him greater pleasure, it was a thing he would treasure and it would always hold an honorable position in his home.” Several toasts were proposed and suitably responded.

Home Defence Force. Taken at the front of Hallcroft in 1916. Mr. Dunlop who lived at Hallcroft is in the centre front. He commanded the unit.

This picture is likely to be the one referred to in the presentation above, as the dates and the Commander are the same

 
Addingham Recruits
The following picture shows recruits outside the Recruiting Office at the Addingham Post Office, then at 103, Main Street (later to be Dr. Raubitschek’s surgery.
The Bradford Pals

Part of the Bradford Pals (below), gathered before being sent to France and the horrors of the Somme. In the early days of mobilization of the British armed forces so called pals battalions were formed in many towns throughout Britain, locally lIk1ey and Bradford. At the time it was thought a good idea for young men to join the forces with their friends and neighbours or their fellow factory and office workers. They thought it would be very good for morale among the troops as they served together in the conflict. Unfortunately due to horrendous casualties that occurred at the front whole towns were decimated with the loss of their young men. As a result of this the formation of pals battalions was dispensed with.